Contents

JUnit 5 conditionally execute tests

Introduction

This post explains how to run Junit 5 test only if they meet a specific condition. This is useful for a test you want only to run on a certain OS, other criteria like time of day for example.

Run test only on certain Operating systems

There are test cases you only want to run a specific operating system (OS). To enable or disable a test for a particular OS, you can use the @EnabledOnOs and @DisabledOnOs, respectively. These annotations will let you disable/enable specific tests based on the OS parameter you passed as a parameter.

In the following example, you can see various ways of using this annotation on test cases.

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// Enabled tests
@Test
@EnabledOnOs(OS.WINDOWS)
void YourTestMethodForWindows(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@EnabledOnOs({OS.WINDOWS, OS.LINUX})
void YourTestMethodForWindowsAndLinux(){
    // Your test implementation
}

// Disabled tests
@Test
@DisabledOnOs(OS.SOLARIS)
void YourTestMethodNotForSolaris(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@DisabledOnOs({OS.WINDOWS, OS.LINUX})
void YourTestMethodNotForWindowsAndLinux(){
    // Your test implementation
    // for everything but Windows and Linux
}

Run test only on certain Java versions

It is also possible to enable or disable a test case based on the Java version that is executing the test. To do so, you can use the @EnabledOnJre or @DisabledOnJre annotation. These annotations accept a single Java version or an array of versions.

There are also two annotations that let you set a range for the Java versions, for example, from Java 8 to version 17. In the following example, you can see how we use these annotations:

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// Enabled tests
@Test
@EnabledOnJre(JRE.JAVA_17)
void testOnlyOnJava17(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@EnabledOnJre({JRE.JAVA_16,JRE.JAVA_17})
void testOnlyOnJava17and16(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@EnabledForJreRange(min =JRE.JAVA_8, max= JRE.JAVA_17)
void testOnlyFromJava8ToJava17(){
    // Your test implementation
}

// Disabled tests
@Test
@DisabledOnJre(JRE.JAVA_17)
void testDisabledForJava17(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@DisabledOnJre({JRE.JAVA_16,JRE.JAVA_17})
void testDisabledOnJava17and16(){
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@DisabledForJreRange(min =JRE.JAVA_8, max= JRE.JAVA_17)
void testDisabledForJava8ToJava17(){
    // Your test implementation
}

Run tests based on an environment variable

Disabling a test based on an environment variable works the same as we would do with a system variable. To do so, use the
@EnabledIfEnvironmentVariable and the @DisabledIfEnvironmentVariable. These annotations take as a parameter the name of the environment variable and an expression that will be matched against the environment variable.

In the following example, you can see how we use this annotation:

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@Test
@EnabledIfEnvironmentVariable(named = "MyVar", matches = ".*t.*")
void onlyWhenEnvironmentVariableIsTrue() {
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@DisabledIfEnvironmentVariable(named = "MyVar", matches = "false")
void disableBasedOnEnvironmentVariable() {
    // Your test implementation
}

Run tests based on a custom method call

If the built-in annotations don't cover your use case, you can also use a method that returns a boolean. To enable/disable a test based on a method's return value, use the @EnabledIf or @DisabledIf annotation. The annotation takes as a parameter the name of the method you want to use.

In the following example, you can see how we use the method to enable or disable a test from running.

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@Test
@EnabledIf("IsTestEnabled")
void testWillRun() {
    // Your test implementation
}

@Test
@DisabledIf("IsTestEnabled")
void testWillNotRun() {
    // Your test implementation
}

private boolean IsTestEnabled() {
    return true;
}

Conclusion

In this article, we looked at how we can disable and enable threads based on different kinds of conditions. We used the operating system, Java Version, Environment variable, and a custom method to determine if a test should run or not.

Further reading

More about testing in Java:

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